Deghayes make case for anti-terror project (From The Argus) theargus.co.uk/news/15441313.…

Harriet Vickers

Harriet Vickers – Research Officer, CMO

August 21, 2015 | foundation4peace

Harriet’s five steps to PEACE

We asked each of our team members, five steps that everyone can take to bring about Peace.

P – Project at the Foundation everyone should know about

E – Extremism challenge that needs resolving

A – A fact people might know about the Foundation

C – Colleague at the Foundation you want people to get to know

E – Everyone can help the cause of peace by….

Here are Harriet’s answers:

P – Project at the Foundation everyone should know about

The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace was founded 20 years ago by victims for victims. The Survivors Assistance Network (SAN) was set up to support and provide a self-help network for those affected by political violence, conflict and terrorism. It brings people together and focuses on enabling people to cope and recover after acts of terrorism. Beneficiaries of SAN gain self-help support and assistance from not only our wonderful Programme Professionals, but also from a network of other survivors, victims, and bereaved.

E – Extremism challenge that needs resolving

What I have increasingly found is that there is a fundamental challenge surrounding the understanding and use of the term extremism. Like terrorism and other terms that are prominent in this field, extremism carries both positive and negative connotations. For example, people sometimes assimilate extremism and radicalisation with that of a process or action that affects some form of change in society. The example of the suffragette movement (a Twentieth Century movement which advocated the right of women to be allowed to vote), is often used to cite an extremist or radical cause which affected positive change, resulting in women’s right to suffrage. Whereas the use of these terms in contemporary public dialogue are often used to perpetuate extremism or radicalisation as vitriolic, pernicious, and a process whereby young people in particular are being drawn in to violent conflict or encouraged to use violence for the ideological, political or social gains of a particular group or cause. How do we use either or both terms then, to ensure we are protecting or safeguarding people, whilst encouraging healthy dialogue and action around the issues and current associations of these terms, without isolating or alienating an equal contribution to a democratic society by all members, one that purportedly perpetuates peace? Can you be an extremist for peace; a radical peace activist? Here at the foundation, the only campaign we advocate for is one of Peace; whilst we recognise that conflict is often inevitable in such a diversely populated global community, violence is not, and should not be.

A – A fact people might know about the Foundation

The Red Cedar which clads the entire building has a guarantee of 80 years, 15 down, 65 to go.

C – Colleague at the Foundation you want people to get to know

Brian Povey, Warrington Wolves super fan, has been a part of the Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace team for approximately three years. Previous to his role at the Foundation for Peace he worked for 30 years for a Warrington based Accountancy firm. Brian and the other members of the behind-the-scenes team, work tremendously hard and successfully to keep the Foundation’s cogs running smoothly.

E – Everyone can help the cause of peace by….

Pledge to sponsor a dove-for-peace. A display of 200 engraved Doves for Peace will form a visual statement of the community’s dedication to the achievement of peace in the centre’s Foyer. Each dove will be a symbol of a group or individual’s commitment to peace, whether in hope for the future or in memory. More than 10,000 visitors from all over the world use the Peace Centre each year, and everyone who joins this campaign will be welcomed to see their personalised dove and find out more about the difference their support is making.

Personal Biography:

My professional association with the Foundation for Peace began in May 2013, after I was graciously invited to take part in a Young Ambassador’s Programme for people affected by terrorism, political violence and conflict in New York, with an organisation called Strength to Strength. After I returned from the immeasurably positive and supportive programme, I volunteered some of my time to support the then Survivors for Peace programme, now known as the Survivors Assistance Network.

Volunteering my time allowed me greater access to literature and contemporary discussions around the topics of conflict, political violence and terrorism, along with conflict resolution and transformation theories. This content, structure and exposure provided me with great personal and professional support as I entered my third and final year of university, studying English Literature and History at Lancaster University (of which I survived).

I began an internship just under two years later for the Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace as a Research Officer, as a beneficiary of the Rank Foundation’s Time to Shine internship programme, and am extremely happy that I am still here, 10 months later.

My association with the Foundation for Peace actually extends as far back as the Warrington bomb itself. My family were caught in the bomb, with my Dad, sister and mum being injured, my mum substantially so that her left leg was amputated above her knee, and 15 months after the bomb, succumbed to a form of malignant melanoma (skin cancer) after the injuries she sustained in the bomb.

I owe a great deal and cannot offer my gratitude enough to the Foundation for Peace for how they have supported me both personally and professionally. Getting the chance to work in such an evolving industry and in the field of work we are situated in, is professionally and personally fulfilling and satisfying. The different interaction and involvement in the current projects and programmes that I have been afforded, has provided me with the skills and put me on course to help prevent anyone having to ever experience traumatic loss because of political, ideological or personal grievances, injustices or beliefs.

Contact:

harriet.vickers@foundation4peace.org