Holding Difficult Conversations

Opportunity for Liverpool secondary school teachers

January 7, 2016 | Nick Taylor

Responding to demand from Liverpool secondary school teachers, that we have been working with over the past few years on matters relating to community cohesion and the PREVENT agenda –the Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace has developed a bespoke teacher training programme, ‘Holding Difficult Conversations,’ that helps teachers tackle such topics in the classroom.

PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS CLICK HERE

In the wake of the recent attacks in Paris, Beirut and the conflicts happening across the world that are politicising and affecting our young people – this programme helps teachers to manage these issues sensitively.

The programme is specifically designed to support the Ofsted and government requirement around building resilience. It takes place on one day and seeks to build the confidence and abilities of teachers to examine ‘difficult’ topics and behaviours as well as to bolster ideas on how to develop a curriculum to achieve resilience.

Follow this link for more detail.

Places are not limited per school.

The courses are provided free of charge with the support of Liverpool City Council. The course will take place on Monday 25th January and as places are limited, you should book as soon as possible.

This training is for Liverpool secondary school teachers and educators who work with pupils aged 11-19 .

It will take place at The Conference Centre at LACE, L17 1AA on Monday, 25 January 2016 from 09:00 to 17:00.

The deadline for registration is Friday 22nd January for this course. Please register by clicking here

Holding Difficult Conversations (Liverpool Secondary School Teachers)

Extreme group’s show no signs of abating in their keenness to recruit our young people. The trusting relationships that teachers have with young people can be key to supporting the development of critical thinking and approaches that help build resilience. The PREVENT DUTY: the obligation on statutory bodies to prevent people becoming drawn into extremism, places significant obligations on schools. There is a need for many frontline staff to acquire the awareness, skills, knowledge, and confidence to ensure that they can spot signs of concern and vulnerability.

The PREVENT DUTY: the obligation on statutory bodies to prevent people becoming drawn into extremism, places significant obligations on schools. There is a need for many frontline teachers to acquire the awareness, skills, knowledge, and confidence to ensure that they can spot signs of concern and vulnerability. Importantly, however, there is also a need to build and further develop resilience. This course will help teachers to challenge prejudice constructively, counter extreme ideas and narratives by broadening perspectives, and provide alternatives to the persuasive narratives that can appeal to our young people. Foundation for Peace has been working in schools, with teachers and communities for 20 years on

This course will help teachers to challenge prejudice constructively, counter extreme ideas and narratives by broadening perspectives, and provide alternatives to the persuasive narratives that can appeal to our young people. Foundation for Peace has been working in schools, with teachers and communities for 20 years on

The Foundation for Peace has been working in schools, with teachers and communities for 20 years on Prevention and has developed education resources across the UK, Canada and Europe. The programme draws on the significant experience and a strong curriculum developed to help create safe environments for difficult conversations with an emphasis on conflict resolution approaches to dialogue and discourse. Our philosophy is that conflict sensitive approaches to tackling ‘difficult issues’ at the earliest stages is key to prevention and can help truly transform the classroom keeping young people safe. This is what informs this programme.